Showing posts with label New Hampshire. Show all posts
Showing posts with label New Hampshire. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Bishop McCormack Defends Life

Editor:  If this Bishop is allowed to campaign against the slaughter of babies, it's likely he's allowed to do so only because he supported Obamacare.  

This time when New Hampshire’s Catholic bishop got involved in a political issue, there was no outcry.
The last time he got involved, the GOP leadership in the New Hampshire House got hot under the collar.
This time the issue was HB 329, a bill from the Republican-controlled Legislature that requires a teen to notify her parents about her intention to get an abortion.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Papal Knight to Speak at Saint Benedict Center Conference

Sir Charles


[Saint Benedict Center] The Saint Benedict Center, administered by the Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, will hold its fifteenth annual conference on October 7-8, 2011. The conference will be held on the monastery grounds in Richmond, New Hampshire. Call 603-239-6485, email bam@catholicism.org, or visit cat.catholicism.org for registration information.

The theme of this year’s conference will be Right and Freedom: Catholic Considerations on Misused Concepts. Included in the list of speakers is author, papal historian, and lecturer, Charles A. Coulombe, K.C.S.S. By order of Pope John Paul II, Mr. Coulombe was created a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Sylvester for his services rendered to the Holy See. Author of the chart-climbing The Pope's Legion, and Puritan’s Empire: A Catholic Perspective on American History, Coulombe is recognized internationally for his in-depth knowledge of Vatican politics and the influence of Catholicism in America and Europe. His audiences regularly range from graduate students at Oxford University, England to the New Mexico Military Institute, from which he graduated. His international articles have appeared in the New Oxford Review, National Catholic Register, American Thinker, Los Angeles Catholic Mission, Monarchy Canada, and The Irish Democrat.

The list of speakers also includes retired U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Beret) officer Dr. Robert Hickson, a former professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy and the Defense Intelligence College, and former Chairman of the Literature and Latin Department at Christendom College. Joining Dr. Hickson will be the celebrated Catholic writer and chronicler of the traditionalist movement in the Church, Gary Potter, the founding editor of Triumph magazine and the author of After the Boston Heresy Case.

Other speakers include Brother André Marie, M.I.C.M., Prior of the Saint Benedict Center since 2002, and lecturer in the fields of apologetics, ecclesiology, church history and devotional practices; Boston’s veteran culture warrior and noted defender of the Faith, C.J. Doyle, Executive Director of the Catholic Action League of Massachusetts; and noted Catholic psychotherapist and lecturer, G.C. Dilsaver, PsyD, MTS, author of Imago Dei Psychotherapy: A Catholic Conceptualization and The Three Marks of Manhood: How to Be Priest, Prophet and King of Your Family.

Brother André Marie made the following comment: “This year, our conference will explore two very maltreated concepts, both of which are necessary for an orderly natural society, and both of which are elevated by God in the real life, the life of grace, which we live in God’s true Church. In these days when increasing governmental hubris both asserts non-extant 'rights,' (e.g., 'gay marriage') and denies fundamental human freedom (e.g., abortion), Catholics must recover and safeguard the proper notions of right and freedom. As usual, our fine panel of speakers will treat their subject in a way that is both illuminating and motivating, informative and practical. They will show how the solutions to the ills of society, the family, and the individual soul are to be found in Catholic tradition.”

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass will be offered according to the traditional Roman Rite (“Extraordinary Form”) during the conference, as it always is offered at Saint Benedict Center.

Monday, December 14, 2009

Adulterty Is Still a Crime in New Hampshire


Owing to unnatural and destructive customs of co-habitation, protestantism and the overall denigration of the spiritual dimension and sacramentality of all things, some lawmakers are regarding laws punishing adultery as obsolete. They are correct, but obsolescence isn't a very good word, a better description might be erroneous or "bad law" for a $1200 fine really doesn't meet the gravity of the crime of transgressing against the Sacrament. Israel's infidelity against God merited her severe punishments, so a day in the stocks is really very mild, too mild, to measure the kind of damage done not only to economics, honor, one's heart, but also the immeasurable damage it does to the spiritual realm, which ultimately undermines the security of a family, a nation,a race and even to being itself.

Dec 13, 3:22 PM (ET)

By NORMA LOVE

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - The original punishments - including standing on the gallows for an hour with a noose around the neck - have been softened to a $1,200 fine, yet some lawmakers think it's time for the 200-year-old crime of adultery to come off New Hampshire's books.

Seven months after the state approved gay marriage, lawmakers will consider easing government further from the bedroom with a bill to repeal the adultery law.

"We shouldn't be regulating people's sex lives and their love lives," state Rep. Timothy Horrigan said. "This is one area the state government should stay out of people's bedrooms."

Horrigan, D-Durham, and state Rep. Carol McGuire, R-Epsom, have teamed up on legislation to repeal the law. Horrigan signed on because he believes it continues New Hampshire's efforts toward marriage equality. In June, lawmakers voted to legalize gay marriage - a law that takes effect Jan. 1.

"We shouldn't be in the business of regulating what consenting adults do with each other," Horrigan said.

Convicted adulterers years ago faced standing on the gallows, up to 39 lashes, a year in jail or a fine of 100 pounds. The punishment has been relaxed to a misdemeanor and a fine of up to $1,200 - with no jail time.

Law Professor Jeff Atkinson of DePaul University College of Law in Chicago says states rarely - if ever - enforce criminal adultery laws. Atkinson, author of the American Bar Association's Guide to Marriage, Divorce & Families, attributed that to a 2003 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Lawrence v. Texas. In its decision, the high court found that the state had no legitimate interest justifying its intrusion into the personal and private lives of two gay men arrested in their bedroom during a police investigation in a weapons case. The men had been charged with sodomy.

Atkinson said the case applies to adultery because both involve private sexual conduct.

Some recently questioned whether South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford's admitted extramarital affair with a woman in Argentina made him subject to his state's 1880 criminal law against adultery. [put him in the stocks at least] The penalty is a fine of up to $500 and a year in jail. The state said it couldn't waste limited money trying to prosecute Sanford on such a charge. The law's constitutionality also has been questioned.

The last attempts to repeal New Hampshire's law came after a Merrimack husband filed a complaint against his wife and her boss in 1987. When police refused to pursue adultery charges, Robert Stackelback brought the complaint himself against the pair. He later dropped the charges.

That prompted repeal efforts in 1987 and 1989. Both times the House voted for repeal, but the Senate did not. An attempt in 1992 to reduce the penalty to a violation also passed the House, but died in the Senate.

House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Chairman Stephen Shurtleff's committee will hear the latest bill, probably next month. Shurtleff, D-Concord, predicts - barring a compelling reason to keep the law - his committee will support repealing the law since it isn't being enforced.

In the past, conservatives argued decriminalizing adultery would weaken marriage.

Kevin Smith, executive director of the conservative Cornerstone Policy Research, opposes this repeal effort for the same reason.

"Even though this criminal law probably is not enforced right now and probably has not been enforced for some time, I think it's important to have a public policy statement that says generally or in all situations adultery is not a good thing. And I think, by repealing that statute, you're essentially diminishing the harmful effects of adultery," Smith said.

McGuire, the prime sponsor, believes the moral battle over adultery should be fought under the state's civil divorce laws. The bill would leave adultery as a cause in divorces not filed under the no-fault provision of the statute.

But Smith says leaving the criminal law on the books may give the harmed spouse more leverage in winning a settlement in divorce court.

Atkinson points out that New Hampshire's divorce law already allows judges to account for substantial harm done by an adulterer in determining a financial settlement and alimony.

Horrigan doesn't think a small fine will stop anyone from cheating on a spouse. He also wouldn't oppose taking adultery out of the civil divorce statute as a cause for the breakdown.

"Who we love and how we love is not something, an area the state has much business meddling in," he said.

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