Thursday, June 23, 2016

"Cardinal Schönborn Like You've Never Seen Him Before" -- Visits Sikh Temple

"Cardinal Schönborn like you've never seen him before"--
The Cardinal sitting cross legged with orange head scarf in a
Sikh Temple in Vienna 

(Vienna) "Cardinal Christoph Schönborn live you've never seen him before: cross-legged with an orange stole as a headscarf. Occasion: Schönborn attended the Sikh temple in Meidling (12th district) on Sunday, in which he paid tribute to the freedom of religion. It was the first official visit to this religious community" reported the Austrian complimentary newspaper Heute.
The Sikh religion was founded just over 500 years ago by their first Guru (master) Nanak in the Punjab. Nanak was born into a Hindu family and belonged to the caste of traders. The Punjab had been subjected in the early 13th century by Muslim sultans.  Nanak attempted to overcome this opposition and the Hindu caste system  through a combination of Hinduism and Islam in a new syncretic religion. So he gathered the Sikhs around himself, which means "student."  Nanak's birthplace is now in Pakistani Punjab, the Golden Temple of Amritsar, the center of Sikhism, in contrast to the Indian Punjab.
Worldwide, the number of Sikhs is estimated at around 25 million. 80 percent of them live in India, and three quarters of them in the state of Punjab. The Punjab is the historic and current center of Sikhism. Only two percent of Indians are Sikhs, but almost 60 percent of the inhabitants of the Punjab. In the partition of British India,  which evenly divided the Punjab between India and Pakistan, there was an exchange of populations by expulsion, deportation and resettlement. Since then, there are hardly any Sikhs living in the Pakistani Punjab.

Around 10,000 Sikhs in Austria


Cardinal Schönborn in Vienna's Sikh temple

The number of Sikh people living in Austria is estimated at 10,000, just over half of whom live in Vienna. The number of almost 3,000 in the last state religious survey of 2001 is long outdated. In the past 15 years, their share has more than tripled.
Because what was written in 2001 about the religion is no longer applicable, there is no certain information about the rapid growth of these and other foreign religions. The lack of surveys, which is based on the fact that religion is a "private matter,"  makes the quick shifts caused by mass immigration invisible. 

Murder of a guru in Vienna

On 24 May 2009 the Austrian Sikh community was put in the spotlight as a guru of  the Ravidas sect was murdered in their temple in Rudolfsheim-Fünfhaus (15 district of Vienna).  Sant Rama Nand was revered by his followers as a "saint." Six Sikhs attacked the worshipers present in the temple with daggers and firearms. The guru was murdered while 15 worshipers and an attacker were injured, some seriously.
The conflict had to do with the caste system. The victims were members of the lower caste Dalits, the untouchables. The attackers, also Sikhs, belonged to a higher class. For them, the Ravidasis are a despicable sect because they adore living gurus as "saints" and not just the ten classical gurus who lived from 1500 to 1800. The Ravidasis are branched mainly from the caste of Dalits, which makes the religious conflicts a caste conflict, although the Sikhs officially reject the Hindu caste system,  the Indian legal system also really doesn't recognize it either, daily life in Indian society, which includes the Sikhs, however, continue to be determined by the caste system.
The violence sparked a discussion that   cultural, historical and political conflicts are also imported by mass immigration.

No recognized religious community

 Sikhs have arrived especially since the 80's, as the newspaper publisher Mediaprint procured exemptions from the Residence Act so it could procure cheap labor for its newspaper distribution. Most remained, brought their families and received Austrian citizenship.
In Vienna there are two Sikh Temples, which  Cardinal Schönborn visited, one in Meidling (12th district) and another in Donaustadt (22nd district). Plus, there's the aforementioned Ravidas Temple in the 15th district. The Ravidasis split off after the assassination of the Sikhs and see themselves since then as an independent religious community.
Neither the Sikhs nor Ravidasis enjoy neither the status of a recognized, nor even of a registered religious community in Austria. Both are organized as "religious associations."
Text: Giuseppe Nardi
Picture: Today (screenshots)
Trans: Tancred vekron99@hotmail.com
Link to Katholishes...
AMDG

36 comments:

  1. Would 'Cardinal' Schornborn ever set foot in a chapel belonging to the SSPX? We can guess the answer.
    G

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  2. They should keep the stupid ass.

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  3. I'll bet the Cardinal is embarrassed to be a white male and a "Catholic" cleric. I'm sure nothing would make him happier, than to stand at the podium of the UN and apologize to the world for both of his defects. Yet another occasion to say, thank you Dear Lord for the SSPX.

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    1. He's mostly just embarrassing.

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  4. The Lord continues to be scourged by His own. What a disgraceful display by a so-called Prince of the Church. A perfect Vatican II moment.

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  5. For ths and a lot of other past actions, he is one sick dude.
    Damian Malliapalli

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  6. Jack of all trades,master of none.

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  7. Sikhism is not mix of Hinduism or Islam. STOP giving false information to your readers

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    1. What is it, then? I am curious, as I'd bet others are. What parts of the description in the news article are true? Based on the news article, you'd expect all Dalits to become Sikhs, the lack of any explanation in this regard Lending some credence to your statement. So I'd appreciate any insight you provide.

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    2. Sikhism and Islam officially reject the caste system, although it's a hard habit to break, apparently.

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    3. My ham-handed way of describing the putative essence of Mohammedanism is subjection to a capricious divine being, and that of Hinduism to a pantheistic and indifferent oneness of the universe. how about the Sikh?

      Don't we have caste systems in what was once Christendom, mitigated by the grace of God?

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  8. That photo captures perfectly the combination of slovenly thinking in so many categorical areas and heresy that springs from it. He is truly the poster boy of Modernism. Why hasn't Muller called him out?

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    1. Why should he? JPII kissed the Koran, hugged Mullahs and worst of all, continued to permit women and girls to serve on the sanctuary.

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    2. Benedict, if I understand correctly, had some discreet words of wisdom for JPII. But women and girls in the sanctuary are worse? On what do you base this?

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    3. I gave you a perfectly clear and objective answer. You might have 'some discreet words' with him/her/them if you are at all in the habit of talking to brick walls.

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    4. They're only clear in your own disordered inclinations, I expect.

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    5. Tancred, or anybody, help me out here: what the heck is Ho-sephina nattering on about? Modern keyboards on newfangled electronic devices seem to addle him.

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    6. He spouts the same old platitudes, but they're ineffective and tired. Now that he's the age of his grandparents when he was an annoying, pretentious adolescent, and he finds the reappearance of the old ideas, the ones he carelessly rejected, newly presented, reaffirmed, intimidating and inexplicable. He thinks he walled them up a long time ago but they're just as alive as they always were, their dissemination aided by modern technology, and held sincerely by the young, which surely also frustrates him.

      Does he also feel guilty for giving in too easily to a fashion which hasn't stood the test of time?

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    7. I don't think the old guy feels any guilt, but then, I am nor a "physic of the soul," just Everyman involved in a sort of entertainment industry.

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    8. If I wasted my life on the music of Marty Haugen, the theology of Lonergan, the Liturgy of Marini and the history of Bokkenkotter, I'd be pretty ashamed and perhaps a little guilty.

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    9. Yes, but you have a conscience that is formed by Catholic teaching and is evinced by your expression of Catholic sensibilities.

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    10. Is a Catholic conscience really necessary to realize what a boondoggle it is?

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  9. The caste system in India dates back thousands of years, possibly it's earlies development in around 1500 BC(not earlier). It began with the migration into India of the Vedic peoples (tribes), which in time groups together in a single unit and were known as the "Aryas" (Noble=Pure ones), light skinned peoples, as compared to the original inhabitants of India who were/are much darker but are not like African people in appearance. There are so called "Negroid" peoples in India who are dark like African people...they are the most ancient, aboriginal people in India and there are not many left. They are congregated in the south of India.
    The caste system developed as part of the Varna (class) system of classification, developed by the "Aryas"(pure Ones). They were distinctive groups broken down into the:
    the The Brahmins were the priestly caste, and thus the most influential, respected,scholarly.
    The Kshatryas-rulers,warriors,aristocrats, wealthy landed peoples.
    Vaishyas- artists,merchants,painters,craftsmen
    Shudras=laborers,peasants
    Dalits (untouchables...usually the very dark or aboriginal peoples considered inferiors and almost like outcasts( like lepers were in Medieval Europe).
    The Caste system predominated in Indian Hindu society. Sikhism, Islam, Buddhism, and of course Christianity(Catholicism) did not adopt the caste system. Many "untouchable" (Dalit) peoples converted from Hinduism to Islam, Sikhism or Christianity....and within the last century tens of millions to Buddhism in India to escape the caste system which relegated them to the loest rung in society. Outside of Hinduism and the caste, they could be/do anything and rise to anything they
    wished. Millions of Dalit peoples today have sparked a renaissance of Buddhism in India, where it had almost died out.
    I think Cardinal Schoenborn is mentally unbalanced anyway, but it is seen in India as "patronizing" for him to dress like that in the photo and enter the temple...just like many Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs were scandalized that John Paul II did pretty much the same thing, because they and their leaders would never go into a Catholic Church and embrace our traditions....they are proud of their own.
    Since Vatican II, the Catholic Church ahs lost the love and pride for our own traditions and religion, instead seeking out new and the different. All that has done is cause confusion, and the spiritual bankruptcy of the Vatican II Catholic Church. It is a tragedy that will end only when these aged people like Schoenborn and Francis and the rest in their 60;s etc.....are gone.
    Damian Malliapalli

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  10. I didn't wish anyone dead, Buddy Man. Learn how to read /interpret correctly.

    Damian Malliapalli

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